Seat Arona Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
I bought my Seat Arona (68 plate) from a car dealership (not Seat) last September.
My husband was driving the car home the other day and the car turned off completely and he had to drift onto the hard shoulder. It could not be restarted - total loss of power.
Our local garage (again, not a Seat dealer) has spent days taking the engine apart to investigate the cause and have said that essentially the camshaft gear failed causing the gearbox to (I quote) 'explode', causing damage to the engine around it. We have been quoted at least £2.5k for the repair. They have told us this was a freak occurance which can only have been caused by a manufacturing fault.
My question is, would we have any recourse to go back to Seat over this? The car is 4 years old in September.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Where MOT was done is irrelevant, but the servicing might catch you out.

Still worth pushing for goodwill, if other garage didn’t update service record (and only just done, but was on time) then Seat service record might show it is fully serviced. There is a couple of weeks grace after service date (to allow for workshop booking delays)

In meantime, make sure parts are bagged, and kept, get them put in car boot or in bag in rear seat footwell. If damaged parts are thrown away then very difficult to prove a manufacturing defect. Sometimes you will need to involve an independent analysis to show faulty casting or machining.

Good luck
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
599 Posts
The camshaft and gearbox are totally separate units, and cannot affect one another surely ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
The camshaft and gearbox are totally separate units, and cannot affect one another surely ?

I agree - the Camshaft - is not connected in any way with the gearbox.

If the camshaft chain (more likely belt) snaps - you can damage the pistons and valves - but they will all be contained within the engine and extremely unlikely - to push a piston through the side of an engine into a gearbox.

I suggest you get a better more detailed explanation...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top